Kitchen Remodel In Orange County California ~ Godwin Construction ~ The Best In Home Renovation


Kitchen Remodel In Orange County California ~ Godwin Construction ~ The Best In Home Renovation
Godwin Construction in Buena Park is the best in home construction. Kitchen remodels/renovations, room additions, concrete and roofing.

Dennis Godwin and his team of expert craftsman did this remodel in less than 3 weeks.

Godwin Construction can be reached at (714) 826-5154.

We used Aspen Woodworks for out custom kitchen cabinets.
Aspen Woodworks Cypress, California 714 484-1995.

For our Granite countertops we used

Stoneware Enterprises, Inc
1571 S State College Blvd Anaheim, CA.
(714) 704-6600

http://www.stonewaregranite.com

A kitchen is a room or part of a room used for cooking and food preparation.
In the West, a modern residential kitchen is typically equipped with a stove, a sink with hot and cold running water, a refrigerator and kitchen cabinets arranged according to a modular design. Many households have a microwave oven, a dishwasher and other electric appliances. The main function of a kitchen is cooking or preparing food but it may also be used for dining, food storage, entertaining, dishwashing and laundry.

A trend began in the 1940s in the United States to equip the kitchen with electrified small and large kitchen appliances such as blenders, toasters, and later also microwave ovens. Following the end of World War II, massive demand in Europe for low-price, high-tech consumer goods led to Western European kitchens being designed to accommodate new appliances such as refrigerators and electric/gas cookers.
Parallel to this development in tenement buildings was the evolution of the kitchen in homeowner’s houses. There, the kitchens usually were somewhat larger, suitable for everyday use as a dining room, but otherwise the ongoing technicalization was the same, and the use of unit furniture also became a standard in this market sector.
General technocentric enthusiasm even led some designers to take the “work kitchen” approach even further, culminating in futuristic designs like Luigi Colani’s “kitchen satellite” (1969, commissioned by the German high-end kitchen manufacturer Poggenpohl for an exhibit), in which the room was reduced to a ball with a chair in the middle and all appliances at arm’s length, an optimal arrangement maybe for “applying heat to food”, but not necessarily for actual cooking. Such extravaganzas remained outside the norm, though.

Starting in the 1980s, the perfection of the extractor hood allowed an open kitchen again, integrated more or less with the living room without causing the whole apartment or house to smell. Before that, only a few earlier experiments, typically in newly built upper-middle-class family homes, had open kitchens. Examples are Frank Lloyd Wright’s House Willey (1934) and House Jacobs (1936). Both had open kitchens, with high ceilings (up to the roof) and were aired by skylights. The extractor hood made it possible to build open kitchens in apartments, too, where both high ceilings and skylights were not possible.

The re-integration of the kitchen and the living area went hand in hand with a change in the perception of cooking: increasingly, cooking was seen as a creative and sometimes social act instead of work. And there was a rejection by younger home-owners of the standard suburban model of separate kitchens and dining rooms found in most 1900-1950 houses. Many families also appreciated the trend towards open kitchens, as it made it easier for the parents to supervise the children while cooking and clear up spills. The enhanced status of cooking also made the kitchen a prestige object for showing off one’s wealth or cooking professionalism. Some architects have capitalized on this “object” aspect of the kitchen by designing freestanding “kitchen objects”. However, like their precursor, Colani’s “kitchen satellite”, such futuristic designs are exceptions.

Another reason for the trend back to open kitchens (and a foundation of the “kitchen object” philosophy) is changes in how food is prepared. Whereas prior to the 1950s most cooking started out with raw ingredients and a meal had to be prepared from scratch, the advent of frozen meals and pre-prepared convenience food changed the cooking habits of many people, who consequently used the kitchen less and less. For others, who followed the “cooking as a social act” trend, the open kitchen had the advantage that they could be with their guests while cooking, and for the “creative cooks” it might even become a stage for their cooking performance. The “Trophy Kitchen” is highly equipped with very expensive and sophisticated appliances which are used primarily to impress visitors and to project social status, rather than for actual cooking.

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